‘Like Water For Chocolate’ by Common is 20-years-old today

Cover art for Like Water for Chocolate

Today we celebrate the 20th anniversary of Commons fourth studio release Like Water for Chocolate.

Like Water for Chocolate is the introduction of the production team Soulquarians. It consisted of Dilla, ?uestlove, D’Angelo, James Poyser and Pino Palladino. This collective created a canvas for Common to showcase his skill and his soul.

“Funky for You” one of my favorite songs seeps into your spirit. Dilla’s drums are all over it. Bilal and Jill Scott’s voices ring like a mantra singing “As long as it’s funky alright, ok” Common floats over the production and that South Side Chicago sensibility blesses the rhythm.

Funky For You

Like Water for Chocolate ushered in a new sound and created a lane for Common as the consciousness of Hip Hop.The biggest hit and single from the album is “The Light” and the video featuring Erykah Badu helped to launch Common into a different space as he proved that rap can also be romantic and loving. I remember being so moved by that song that it inspired me to propose to my now ex-wife.

“The Light” by Common

The best projects teach you something. Because of this album I know who Fela Kuti is “Time Travelin’ (A Tribute to Fela)” and “A Song for Assata” made me take a real look at freedom and what people have sacrificed for my freedom and theirs.

A Song for Assata

The boldness and spirit of this album is why it has stood the test of time. The tile of the album is inspired by the novel of the same name. Common explains in an interview why he chose it. “Actually the album is named after a movie of the same title. In the movie the main character was a really good cook. She would always be cooking for people. Whenever she would cook, she would really put a lot of emotion into it. So when people would eat her cooking, they were able to feel the same emotions she felt while cooking it. You feel me? So this is the same thing. I put all my heart, my mind and my rawness into these tracks. So I hope that people can feel that when they listen to the album” he said

Congratulations Common for this milestone. Thank you for repping the South Side of Chicago and the culture of Hip Hop the way that you do.

-Precise

Stream “It’s On Me” by Precise

Jill Scott and The Roots light up Ravinia night sky

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Summer and Chicago are having a hard time finding each other right now, but Jill Scott and The Roots were able to bring some heat with them to Ravinia Friday, June 22.

I think I’ve seen The Legendary Roots Crew more than 10 times over the years, and it feels like their show gets stronger with every performance. Black Thought commands the stage with a presence that is all hip-hop. Every solo — from the Jeremy Ellis on the beat box, to guitarist Kirk Douglas blacking out during “You Got Me” — garnered standing ovations. It was easy to forget that The Roots were the opening act and the thought of anyone following The Roots after such a masterful display of showmanship didn’t seem likely.

Jill Scott proved she is more than capable to bring the house down in her own right. Chandeliers hung from the ceiling as Jill sashayed onto the stage and launched into a rendition of “Watching Me” that seemed more timely now than it was when it was originally released. She seemed to have been overcome by emotion as a tear streamed down her face. She gathered herself and preceded to bless her fans with a vocal presence that sounds like honey.

Her voice seems stronger, and she does not shy away from sharing her personal experiences, which pulls her fans in. In the midst of all of her emotion, her smile shined brighter than any light in the pavilion. Watching her perform is like watching a greatness in action.

We spoke to concert-goer A. Jason Lloyd and asked him what he thought of the show.

“The Roots were incredible,” Llyod said. “I think they showed why they are who they are. They are a supergroup. Each solo from their individual members showed they are all superstars, but they can pull together, play together and rock a crowd like no other. Black Thought is the glue that makes everything stick, but I was a bit disappointed that I didn’t see a drum solo from Questlove.

“Jilly from Philly was very powerful and emotional. She took us on a ride that she was in herself,” Lloyd added. “It’s incredible to think that she performs with that same emotion and passion every time she touches the stage. You walk with her on her emotional journey — the highs and lows. At one point, I could see the tears from her eyes. It was really, really a true representation of artistry.”

Check out a few photos from the concert in the gallery below.

 

Listen to “That Ol’ Boom Bap” on Spotify