About Precise

The journey began for Eddy Lamarre, the lyricist who would become Precise. Chicago native Precise developed his skills from his experiences as a child attending his father’s band rehearsals. His father was guitarist and saxophonist in a local band. “Growing up in a Haitian household, music was always prevalent,” Precise recalls. He started off as a DJ but always knew he wanted to rap. After competing in a talent show at Olive Harvey College in Chicago, the judges Producer/DJ Terry Hunter and Armando gave him great feedback. These comments gave Precise the encouragement and confidence to pursue his dream. Upon meeting aspiring artists Chris Rice a.k.a. “Ideal” and Victor Moore a.k.a. "Creole", they formed the group Nubearth. As a group, Nubearth toured in Chicago and regionally. They had the opportunity and memorable experience of opening for Common at Northern Illinois University. This preparation was building Precise the ability to express himself musically, lyrically and command the stage. The stage is a natural setting for him to entertain and perform, the messages through all of these experiences. Precise’s influences range from hip-hop legends KRS-One, Rakim, Slick Rick, Black thought of The Roots, Guru of Gangstar and Mos Def were instrumental in shaping Precise’s style as a lyricist. “I would describe my rap style lyrical substance drawing from the original blueprint of the hip-hop culture,” Precise states. Besides, hip-hop Precise also attributes musical greats as Sting, George Benson, U2 and Gangstar. Precise selected his name from Gangstar's single “Precisely The Right Rhyme”. After being featured on a children’s educational CD “Mind Games”. He completed his first solo project titled My Life. The lead single “It’s On Me” off of the upcoming release of the same name, has an uptempo old-school feel that has become popular among DJ’s domestically and internationally. In 2014 he released "Ladies Love Mixtapes" a project focused on relationships. It was recognized by the Chicago Reader as one of the best projects of the year. “My belief in God and knowing that he has given me a gift to share with the world has helped to overcome that doubt. I have no fear.” - Precise http://precise.bandcamp.com Chicago Reader: https://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/12/26/the-best-overlooked-chicago-hip-hop-releases-of-2014 https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/its-on-me-single/id440704792

LaKeith and the anti-Semitism lie

A few days ago I was in a clubhouse room that focused on the legacy of Minister Louis Farrakhan being tarnished by what some may feel is anti-Semitism. The conversations were extremely heated and contentious.

The creator of the room made it a point to say “I don’t have a dog in this fight” as he moderated the room and allowed people to speak their minds freely. Oscar- nominated actor and frequent clubhouse contributor LaKeith Stansfield joined the room and was brought to the stage and assigned a moderator badge.

It is important to note that the moderator badge is a function of the app and allows the individual to assist in the flow of the conversation. The moderator badge does not signal that the person holding it agrees with everything that is said in the room.

To say the discussion was spirited may be an understatement considering the nature of the conversation and the tone of the participants. One of the participants took to the stage incensed, directing her anger directly at LaKeith reprimanding him for being part of the room the she claimed to be anti-Semitic and not a “safe space” for Jewish people.

This discussion was shared with mainstream media and has now become a narrative that LaKeith is “…flirting with anti-Semitism”.

The Daily Beast and TMZ have all chimed in on this discussion fanning the flames of a lie.

It is my responsibility because I was in that room to say with no uncertain terms that LaKeith was NOT being anti-Semitic in any way shape or form. We can’t allow another Black man to be maligned for simply being in a space.

LaKeith has since apologized since the onslaught of inaccurate reports hit the web. As always in these type of situations we find our brother apologizing .

“At some point during the dialogue the discussion took a very negative turn when several users made abhorrent anti-Semitic statements and at that point, I should have either shut down the discussion or removed myself from it entirely,” he said in the post early Saturday morning.

Telling our own stories and controlling our narrative should be consistent across all media. Let us not allow our brother to be dragged by lies constructed to harm him. Speak up.

-Precise

Listen to “Speak Life” by Precise

Serena Williams is proof white supremacy runs deep

Serena Williams

Recently a picture surfaced on the internet of a woman claiming to be Serena Williams. The post was on her ig page. Her name was by the caption and when you squint your eyes really tight you might be able to make out a vague silhouette of the greatest tennis player the world has ever seen.

In all seriousness the woman in the picture above looks about 5 shades lighter and her eyes are a different color. It begs to question. Is Serena Williams bleaching her skin?

If she is then clearly it is problematic. What kind of message does this send to millions of Black girls around the world? What kind of message does this send to her own daughter?

Many are saying that this is the work of a horrible make up artist. The thought that the lighting is making Serena look like a totally different woman is also floating around. These reasons are disingenuous and misses the point as to what causes this type of action.

White supremacy is a real thing and it is embedded in the DNA of Black people around the world. The effects of torture, raping, killing and pure disregard for Black skin travel in our DNA and presents it self in so many ways.

Racism, colorism, Black men not protecting Black women, Black women not respecting Black men are all ways that this idea of White supremacy rears its ugly head.

White supremacy is not diminished by the size of someone’s bank account or their notoriety. When you are Black, white supremacy oozes out of every crevice of the world around you. It is because of this that we must call it out at every turn and work towards a healing and destroying white supremacy at its root.

Serena Williams deserves the benefit of the doubt and heaps of grace, not because she is the greatest athlete in the world but because she is a Black person who is a victim of this poison known as white supremacy.

-Precise

Stream “Speak Life” by Precise below

Rap legend MF DOOM has died at 49

It has been reported by multiple news sources that Daniel Dumile, also known as the rapper MF DOOM, has died at the age of 49. His passing was confirmed in an Instagram post from his wife Jasmine. At the end of the post she mentioned that he “Transitioned October 31, 2020.”

Dumile started his rap career in the rap group KMD as Zev Love X. His youngest brother, Dj Subroc, was also part of the group. Their most notable song as a group was “Peach Fuzz” off of their debut album, Mr. Hood.

DJ Subroc was killed after being struck by a motorist in 1993 right before the release of KMD’s second album.

In 1997 Dumile resurfaced on the open mic circuit with his new persona, MF DOOM. The character, MF DOOM, was inspired by Marvel Comics super-villain Doctor Doom. In 1999 Dumile released Operation: Doomsday and the hip-hop supervillain was born.

Dumile wore a mask whenever he was in public and his face was never exposed. Because of this unique choice, he would incorporate the use of stand-ins at shows where MF DOOM would be booked. As a fan going to one of his shows you would never know if you were getting the real MF DOOM. It added to his mystique.

DOOM would go on to release many notable projects. The collaboration album Madvillany, created with producer Madlib, was Doom’s first commercial breakthrough. He would later go on to collaborate with Danger Mouse on the album Danger Doom and he also offered up production for Ghostface Killah’s project Fishscale.

Dumile would gain more notoriety in the early 2000s, as his music and voice were used during Adult Swim programming.

The internet caught fire when news of his passing hit. Many were confused based on the circumstances and the fact that this could possibly be a stunt. However, as some of rap’s elite began posting their condolences, it became very real.

DOOM’s label Rhymesayers quelled much of the doubt with their statement. “With heavy hearts, we share these words from MF DOOM’s family. It is our wish to continue to respect their privacy at this difficult time.”

Soup Joumou and Haitian independence should be a marker for Black people everywhere

Soup Joumou (Photo credit: Eddy “Precise” Lamarre)

January 1, 1804 should be a date that lives in the mind of every Black person around the world. This date is important because Haiti declared its independence from the French after defeating Napoleon’s forces.

This is notable for so many reasons. The most notable reason is that an enslaved people rose up and defeated their oppressors to become the first free Black nation in the western hemisphere.

As the world is reflecting the year and planning for the next, Haitians around the world are celebrating freedom with loved ones and a bowl of soup.

Soup Joumou is a squash soup that was consumed by the French oppressors during Haiti’s time of slavery. This dish was kept away from the enslaved Haitians. The oppressors turned their noses up at these enslaved people with each spoonful of their forbidden soup.

After defeating both the French and Spanish forces Haitians embraced this once forbidden soup as their own. It now represents a symbol of freedom, strength and love.

“The same thing that you (French oppressors) thought was so uppity we took and made it better. We enhanced it and now we share and break bread with our families during this independence season to show people that not only are we resilient and fighters but we are crafty and we are able to show love and humility” said Brooklyn born Haitian-American Chef Claudy Pierre.

My mother cooks the soup in the kitchen. The sweet scent of squash and fresh vegetables float through the house and signals a new year and a reminder of where my ancestors are from.

As the ball drops in Time Square, or as you are enjoying your black eyed peas take a moment to acknowledge the strength of Black people. Haiti’s freedom is a representation of what can be accomplished and soup Joumou brings us all together in remembrance of our freedom.

L’Union Fait La Force translates to The Union makes us Strong. We are stronger together.

-Eddy “Precise” Lamarre

Stream/Buy “The Cure” by Precise

An open letter to Terry Crews

Terry Crews

Damn bro stop that shit yo! What are you campaigning for? You ain’t gonna win! Fuck! We are out here fighting for our lives and you feel the need to keep us in line. Ain’t nobody hire you. Ease up Damon! This is a different time for a different sensibility. Get in tune.

-Precise

Stream “The Cure” by Precise

R.A.P. call for a ‘REVOLUTION’ with new video

Video

R.A.P. – REVOLUTION

The hip-hop group R.A.P. (Rkitech and Precise) present the visuals from their single “REVOLUTION” off their upcoming release “The R.A.P. Project”.

The video captures the essence of this moment we are in and speaks to our circumstance in the midst of this pandemic.This situation has sparked a revolution of the mind and has caused people to look within. Creativity and innovation is paramount.

Take a few minutes and watch the video. Share what you think in the comments below.

-Precise

Stream/Buy music from Precise below

Bronx rapper Fred The Godson has died due to COVID-19

Rapper Fred The Godson has passed away due to complications with COVID-19 as reported by Complex. Fred let the world know that he was affected by the virus via his instagram page on April 6, 2020. He posted a picture of himself wearing an oxygen mask and stated “Good morning y’all! Through it all we all are still ‘BLESSED’ hope I all have a blessed,” he wrote.

Fred’s friend and collaborator Jaquae posted to instagram confirming his friends passing. “Sleep in peace brother…You’ll never be forgotten. LOVE U MAN. I have so much things to say but I’m lost right now.” posted Jaqaue

The South Bronx rapper was on the 2011 issue of XXL’s Magazine’s Freshman cover alongside, Kendrick Lamar, Mac Miller, Meek Mill, YG and more.

Fred was a consistent face in the landscape of rap and his skills were highly respected by his peers. He released a few mixtapes that did not reach mainstream acclaim. However they made him official. Check out the freestyle he did on Funkmaster Flex’s show. His wordplay was uncanny.

This story is being updated.

-Precise

Stream Precise music below.